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  • br ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT br Figure

    2020-08-06


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    Figure 1. The vials of our gel electrophoresis analysis. A) vials for KIR genes; 1: negative control, 2:
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    Figure 2. Distribution of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) genotypes in the controls and patients with colorectal rectal cancer. No significant result was observed.
    KIR Genes
    Genotype subgroup
    Inhibitory KIR
    Activating KIR Pseudo No. of
    KIR genotype Genotype No.
    gene Genes
    B/X score
    2DS5 3DS1 2DP1 3DP1 Inhibitory Activating
    Pseudogene
    AA 1 cAcA-tAtA
    2 cAcX-tAtB 2
    3 cAcX-tAtA 1
    4 cAcB-tAtA 1
    5 cAcB-tAtB 2
    6 cAcX-tAtB 2
    7 cAcB-tAtX 2
    8 cBcX-tAtX 3
    9 cBcX-tAtB 3
    Bx 10 cAcX-tAtX 2
    Figure 3. Distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands genotypes in the controls and patients with colorectal rectal cancer. No significant result was observed.
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    Adjusted Predictions with 95% CIs
    B/X score
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    Figure 5. The funnel area in this funnel plot shows 95% CI around the pooled Ln OR (blue line). The Ln ORs are based on association of KIR2DS5 with colorectal cancer, and the pooled Ln OR is calculated
    based on inverse variance weighted method. Studies Portela and Al Omar are significantly different from the pooled result (P <0.05).
    Portela
    Kim
    Middleton
    Our study
    Al Omar
    Ln OR
    Figure 6. Cluster analysis of binary variables with single linkage (tables 4 and 5).
    No significant association
    One significant association(2DS5inbothstudies) (2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 2DS5, 3DS1)Fivesignificantassociation
    Portela
    Middleton Kim Our study Al Omar
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    Table 1. Association of evaluated POM 1 with susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Gene Positive in Positive in
    =64.1%; sensitivity =60%; specificity =60%; accuracy =60%. Because of low power (51.5%) alpha error would not be occurred. Multiple comparison wise (Bonferroni's correction) no significant result was observed.
    Table 2. Association of KIR-HLA interaction with susceptibility to colorectal cancer. No significant result was observed.
    Interaction Positive in Positive in OR Power
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    Table 3. Association of having each KIR haplotypes with susceptibility to colorectal cancer.
    Haplotype Genes
    Positive in Positive in OR Power
    Centromeric A 2DL3
    Centromeric B 2DS2
    Telomeric B* 2DL5
    Telomeric A 3DL1
    Table 4. Association of haplotype B related genes with susceptibility to colorectal cancer in previous
    studies.
    (Spain)
    (Korea) (Saudi Arabia)
    (Brazil)
    cancer Control cancer
    Control cancer Control cancer Control cancer Control
    Table 5. Dissimilarity matrix of binary variables, based on the number and position of significant haplotype related genes (table 5).
    Studies Middleton Kim Al Omar Portela Our study
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    Conflict of Interest
    We declare that there is no personal or commercial conflict of interest. The named products are merely for their previous scientific validation and we do not have any commercial aim. The only personal interest of publishing this paper is reporting the thesis results and our legal obligation to our university. We previously published a meta-analysis on this title and we declare that there is no self-plagiarism or salami publishing; we were just intend to update that meta-analysis with the results of our ethnicity. Original Study
    Association of Low Socioeconomic Status With Adverse Prostate Cancer Pathology Among African American Men Who Underwent Radical Prostatectomy
    Abstract
    We retrospectively reviewed data from 2 institutions for African American men who underwent radical pros-tatectomy (RP) and tested for associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and adverse prostate cancer pathology after RP. Men of low SES had significantly higher prostate-specific antigen values and postsurgical Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA-S) scores, more advanced pathologic stage, higher rates of seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, and adverse pathology. These findings suggest that impoverished populations might benefit from more intensive screening and early, aggressive treatment of prostatic malignancies.
    Background: We tested for associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and adverse prostate cancer pathology in a population of African American (AA) men treated with radical prostatectomy (RP). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from 2 institutions for AA men who underwent RP between 2010 and 2015. Household incomes were estimated using census tract data, and patients were stratified into income groups relative to the study population median. Pathologic outcomes after RP were assessed, including the postsurgical Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment (CAPRA-S) score and a definition of adverse pathology (stage pT3, Gleason score 4þ3, or positive lymph nodes), and compared between income groups. Results: We analyzed data of 347 AA men. Median household income was $37,954. Low-SES men had significantly higher prostate-specific antigen values (mean 10.2 vs. 7.3; P < .01) and CAPRA-S scores (mean 3.4 vs. 2.5; P < .01), more advanced pathologic stage (T3-T4 31.8% vs. 21.5%; P ¼ .03), and higher rates of seminal vesicle invasion (17.3% vs. 8.2%; P <